Original article

Scand J Work Environ Health 2016;42(3):228-236    pdf full text

doi:10.5271/sjweh.3555

The association between job stress and leisure-time physical inactivity adjusted for individual attributes: evidence from a Japanese occupational cohort survey

by Oshio T, Tsutsumi A, Inoue A

Objective We examined the association between job stress and leisure-time physical inactivity, adjusting for individual time-invariant attributes.

Methods We used data from a Japanese occupational cohort survey, which included 31 025 observations of 9871 individuals. Focusing on the evolution of job stress and leisure-time physical inactivity within the same individual over time, we employed fixed-effects logistic models to examine the association between job stress and leisure-time physical inactivity. We compared the results with those in pooled cross-sectional models and fixed-effects ordered logistic models.

Results Fixed-effects models showed that the odds ratio (OR) of physical inactivity were 22% higher for those with high strain jobs [high demands/low control; OR 1.22, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.03–1.43] and 17% higher for those with active jobs (high demands/high control; OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.02–1.34) than those with low strain jobs (low demands/high control). The models also showed that the odds of physical inactivity were 28% higher for those with high effort/low reward jobs (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.10–1.50) and 24% higher for those with high effort/high reward jobs (OR 1.24, 95% CI 1.07–1.43) than those with low effort/high reward jobs. Fixed-effects ordered logistic models led to similar results.

Conclusion Job stress, especially high job strain and effort–reward imbalance, was modestly associated with higher risks of physical inactivity, even after controlling for individual time-invariant attributes.

This article refers to the following text of the Journal: 1994;20(5):349-363